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Apples and Oranges: My Brother and Me, Lost and Found

A TOP TEN FAVORITE BOOK OF THE YEAR--MICHIKO KAKUTANI, THE NEW YORK TIMES

A ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BEST MEMOIR OF THE YEAR

INCLUDES AN AUTHOR INTERVIEW WITH LESLEY STAHL

Marie Brenner's extraordinary memoir of sibling rivalry asks a universal question: How can two people from the same family turn out so entirely different? Brenner's brother, Carl, lives in the apple country of Washington State, cultivating his orchards, polishing his guns, and attending church, while Marie, a world-class journalist and bestselling author, leads a sophisticated life among the "New York libs" whom he loathes. His life far from their secular Jewish childhood in Texas was as mysterious to her as their tangled past. In this affecting family saga, Brenner investigates their contentious history and discovers how inspiring it can be to turn a brother into an ally. Honest, funny, and true, Apples and Oranges is a moving story of sibling rivalry and redemption.

Marie Brenner is writer-at-large for Vanity Fair. Her exposé of the tobacco industry, "The Man Who Knew Too Much," was the basis for the 1999 movie The Insider, which was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. She is also the author of Great Dames: What I learned from Older Women and the bestselling House of Dreams: The Bingham Family of Louisville.

A New York Times Favorite Book of the Year

A St. Louis Post-Dispatch Best Memoir of the Year

Marie Brenner's extraordinary memoir of sibling rivalry asks a universal question: How can two people from the same family turn out so entirely different? Brenner's brother, Carl, lives in the apple country of Washington State, cultivating his orchards, polishing his guns, and attending church, while Marie, a world-class journalist and bestselling author, leads a sophisticated life among the "New York libs" whom he loathes. His life far from their secular Jewish childhood in Texas was as mysterious to her as their tangled past. In this affecting family saga, Brenner investigates their contentious history and discovers how inspiring it can be to turn a brother into an ally. Honest, funny, and true, Apples and Oranges is a moving story of sibling rivalry and redemption.

"Dying of cancer, terrified of becoming an invalid and reluctant to give up his strenuous life, Carl Brenner—a former trial lawyer turned apple grower—prepared to take his own life in early 2003. He returned home to Texas, took his computer hard drive to a garbage dump on the other side of San Antonio, and filled his car with every piece of paper that might tell anyone anything about his life. He invited friends and cousins over to cart away his possessions—his guns, his fishing tackle, his books and prints. And for good measure, he spent several hours erasing all of his last appointments from his calendar. 'He is possessed by his mission—to erase every trace,' his sister, Marie Brenner, writes in this extraordinary memoir. 'He will see to it that there is almost nothing left to draw upon. No files of flirtatious letters from ex-girlfriends or diaries or e-mails that have the slightest degree of intimacy. He will, he decides, simply try to vanish without a trace.' Thanks to his sister’s new book, Apples & Oranges, Carl Brenner did not succeed in vanishing without a trace. Rather, his life, with all its startling twists and turns, and his singular, sometimes maddening personality are magically conjured for us in these pages, as Ms. Brenner uses the prism of her love and grief for her brother—and her bewilderment too—to create a haunting portrait of him and their family. She has written a book that captures the nervous, emotionally strangled relationship she shared with him for the better part of their lives, a book that explores the difficult algebra of familial love and the possibility of its renewal in the face of impending loss . . . In the process of recounting the story of her relationship with her brother, Ms. Brenner also gives us a wonderfully vivid picture of her uncommon family: her grandfather Isidor, who made and lost and made five fortunes in Mexico and Texas; her father, Milton, who always sounded 'very Texas, boastful and confident as if he’d been born in a uniform'; her mother, Thelma, who as an organizer of San Antonio Mothers for Peace made plans to confront Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara in his hotel room ('If I look chic, maybe he’ll let us in'); and her Aunt Anita, who posed for the photographer Edward Weston, interviewed Trotsky and hung out in Mexico with Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and José Clemente Orozco. Ms. Brenner tracks the leitmotifs that run through their lives, the patterns—of sibling estrangements, of fresh starts and do-overs—that have stamped their family tree, and in doing so she has given us a beautifully observed and deeply affecting memoir, a book written with the unsparing eye of a journalist and the aching heart of a sister who learned in March of 2003 that her ailing brother had killed himself. In a note to her, he asked her to forgive him for taking his life. 'Please turn off the air-conditioning,' he added. 'I send you my love, now and forever. Carl.'"—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"If Marie Brenner and her brother, Carl, can learn to love each other, there might be hope for our divided America after all. She’s a hot-shot writer at large for Vanity Fair, an investigative journalist known for taking down corporations; her exposé of the tobacco industry became the 1999 movie The Insider. He is an apple farmer in Washington State with the N.R.A. sticker on his truck who complains about his sister’s 'A.C.L.U. friends in New York.' Illness turns out to be this family’s cure. Carl is discovered to have cancer, and Marie flies to apple country to try to save him. In less capable hands, a memoir of such reconciliation might become a tired on-the-road travelogue or, worse, a bedside tear-jerker. But in Apples and Oranges, Marie Brenner has delivered a majestic little book. She deepens a tragicomic story into a meditation on family and fate . . . In Brenner’s sympathetic portrait, Carl becomes a nuanced conservative character. 'Sometimes you do not get to understand everything,' she concludes. Family trumps politics, and Marie comes to accept her brother’s tough love. One day, brother and sister climb 'through the Galas, up through the Bartletts, the valley stretched out before us. We’re standing in a row of saplings, just planted in this sandy loam soil that he has named after our father. The Milton bloc. "This is where I want my ashes scattered," he says. "Are you listening to me?"' Marie was listening closer than Carl ever imagined. His ashes are scattered throughout this mystical book."—James Panero, The New York Times Book Review

"In this elegiac memoir, the author, a reporter, applies the same investigative skills that led to her exposé of the tobacco industry and Enron to a more intimate subject: her contentious relationship with her late brother . . . At once comic and tinged with regret."—The New Yorker "Deftly traces three generations of a combustible, fascinating family."—The Miami Herald

"This is a book about a brother and sister who didn't like each other much. Can't blame them; neither is very likable. But the book? In Apples & Oranges: My Brother and Me, Lost and Found, Marie Brenner puts heavy demands on her readers but rewards them in the end . . . There is a story, a sad one, that provides food for thought for anyone who has ever struggled to get along with someone close to them—sibling, parent or friend . . . She presents Carl—successful trial lawyer until, at the age of 40, he decides to start growing fruit in Washington state—as a know-it-all always demonstrating superior knowledge, an obsessive neat freak endlessly organizing records, railing against the 'irresponsible profession of yellow journalism' and trying to control the outcome of everything. She was three years younger than Carl, and things weren't right between them from the moment he welcomed his baby sister home by pushing her out a window. She listened to Joan Baez albums; he joined the John Birch Society and smashed her records. In their mother's last moments, she was just around the corner, but he—and the rest of the family—neglected to notify her and had already sent the body to the funeral home before she showed up. She carries her animosity toward him into adulthood, but add terminal illness to the mix and things can change—which is what happens in Apples & Oranges and ultimately pulls the story together and gives the book its depth. And as for controlling the outcome of everything? The choices for Carl are limited, all leading to the same tragic ending."—John B. Saul, The Seattle Times

"Brothers and sisters can be so confounding. How can people who share the same parents turn out so darn different and often be mired in such conflict? That question is at the heart of Marie Brenner's masterly new memoir, Apples & Oranges: My Brother and Me, Lost and Found. Brenner, a writer at large for Vanity Fair magazine, has crafted a courageous and wrenching examination of sibling differences, as well as an important meditation on the limitations of journalism. There is much pain and poignancy here, but also hopeful truths . . . Apples & Oranges is a hard-won testament to the power of love and forgiveness in families. Yet the greatest strength of Marie Brenner's profound memoir is how it asks the toughest of questions b...