Pharmacodynamics: Drug Action, Tachyphylaxis, Ic50, William E. Evans, Drug Tolerance, Drug Intolerance, Desensitization, Biological Activity

Chapters: Drug Action, Tachyphylaxis, Ic50, William E. Evans, Drug Tolerance, Drug Intolerance, Desensitization, Biological Activity, Dosing, Course, Baseline. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 43. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Pharmacodynamics is the study of the physiological effects of drugs on the body or on microorganisms or parasites within or on the body and the mechanisms of drug action and the relationship between drug concentration and effect. One dominant example is drug-receptor interactions as modeled by where L=ligand (drug), R=receptor (attachment site), reaction dynamics that can be studied mathematically through tools such as free energy maps. Pharmacodynamics is often summarized as the study of what a drug does to the body, whereas pharmacokinetics is the study of what the body does to a drug. Pharmacodynamics is sometimes abbreviated as "PD", while pharmacokinetics can be referred to as "PK". The majority of drugs either (a) mimic or inhibit normal physiological/biochemical processes or inhibit pathological processes in animals or (b) inhibit vital processes of endo- or ectoparasites and microbial organisms. There are 5 main drug actions: The desired activity of a drug is mainly due to one of the following: General anesthetics were once thought to work by disordering the neural membranes, thereby altering the Na influx. Antacids and chelating agents combine chemically in the body. Enzyme-substrate binding is a way to alter the production or metabolism of key endogenous chemicals, for example aspirin irreversibly inhibits the enzyme prostaglandin synthetase (cyclooxygenase) thereby preventing inflammatory response. Colchicine, a drug for gout, interferes with the function of the structural protein tubulin, while Digitalis, a drug still used in heart failure, inh...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=726049