Electro-plating

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1905 Excerpt: ... plater's shop, tanks, vats, and other general requisites; batteries, dynamos, and electrical accessories; the appliances for preparing the rough metal surfaces to receive the electro-deposited coat, and for polishing the plated ware; the proper materials, appliances, and methods employed in electro-plating with silver, copper, gold, nickel, iron, lead, tin, platinum, and alloys, and the methods of finishing plated goods. Persons desiring a small plating plant for the purpose of treating trinkets, miscellaneous small articles of the nature of spoons, forks, etc., need not be deterred from carrying out their wishes by the magnitude of the operations or by the expense of the apparatus described in this and succeeding chapters. Metal can be polished by hand to look almost as bright as machine-polished metal, using the same polishing materials and suitable brushes. Small quantities of the same solutions can also be used in smaller vessels, and gold, silver, etc., can be deposited in good condition with current obtained from small cells. It must be understood, however, that the same strict attention to absolute cleanliness, and care in preparation, must be observed in small operations, and the same rules must guide the worker when plating a spoon or a screw as when plating the handle-bar of a bicycle. Readers will find that special attention is paid to the requirements of the amateur and small professional plater in later chapters, their limitations having been taken into careful consideration. The plating shop must be well lighted and ventilated, and kept at a temperature of about 60 F. Good light, preferably from high windows or from a skylight, is necessary for the examination of the work; but receptacles containing silver solutions should be protected from th...