Apoptosis in Inflammation (Progress in Inflammation Research)

Apoptosis is a form of cell death that occurs in a controlled manner and is generally noninflammatory in nature. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, implies a cell death that is part of a normal physiological process of pruning of unneeded cells. However, many disease conditions utilize apoptosis for pathological ends, resulting in inappropriate cell death and tissue destruction. This book starts with an introduction that reviews the general characteristics of apoptosis, its regulation and its role in physiology and disease. Next, the book focuses on three areas as they relate to inflammatory cells and diseases. The first area consists of chapters on signals for apoptosis important to inflammatory cells, namely growth factors and arachidonic acid metabolism. The next area that the book focuses on are effects at the cellular level, on cell survival versus cell death and signals critical for cell function in both normal and disease states. These topics are covered in chapters on lymphocytes, granulocytes, chondrocytes and keratinocytes. The last area that the book focuses on are events at the level of tissue and disease, looking at the evidence for altered apoptosis and/or apoptotic processes in immune and inflammatory diseases. These topics are covered in chapters on rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus, psoriasis and renal disease. Together, these chapters will provide the reader with the latest insight in the role of apoptosis in inflammatory cells and diseases. This book starts with an introduction that reviews the general characteristics of apoptosis, its regulation and its role in physiology and disease. Next, the book focuses on three areas as they relate to inflammatory cells and diseases. The first area consists of chapters on signals for apoptosis important to inflammatory cells, namely growth factors and arachidonic acid metabolism. The next area that the book focuses on are effects at the cellular level, on cell survival versus cell death and signals critical for cell function in both normal and disease states. These topics are covered in chapters on lymphocytes, granulocytes, chondrocytes and keratinocytes. The last area that the book focuses on are events at the level of tissue and disease, looking at the evidence for altered apoptosis and/or apoptotic processes in immune and inflammatory diseases. These topics are covered in chapters on rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus, psoriasis and renal disease. Together, these chapters will provide the reader with the latest insight in the role of apoptosis in inflammatory cells and diseases.