2016 USDA Forest Service Research and Development Tribal Engagement Roadmap Highlights Report by Tania Ellersick, Senior Policy Analyst, Forest Management, National Forest System, USDA Forest Service

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U.S. FOREST SERVICE
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
TRIBAL ENGAGEMENT
ROADMAP HIGHLIGHTS
REPORT
2017 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
CONFERENCE - WASHINGTON, DC
Tania Ellersick, Senior Policy Analyst, Forest Management
National Forest System, U.S. Forest Service
U.S. FOREST SERVICE TRIBAL RELATIONS
STRATEGIC PLAN GOALS
American Indian and
Alaska Native Rights
Ensure the agency redeems
its trust responsibility and
protects American Indian
and Alaska Native reserved
rights as they pertain to
USDA Forest Service
programs, projects, and
policies.
Partnerships
Leverage partnerships to
maximize mutual success.
Program Development
Promote integration and
utility of the Tribal Relations
Program throughout the
agency.
U.S tribes are an integral part of
our American story, leaders in our
natural resource heritage and the
original stewards of the land we
hold so dear.
Tom Tidwell
Chief, USDA Forest Service
U.S. Forest Service Research and Development
TRIBAL ENGAGEMENT ROADMAP OBJECTIVES
1. Build new and enhance existing partnerships with
tribes, indigenous and native groups, tribal colleges,
tribal communities, and intertribal organizations.
2. Institutionalize trust responsibilities and tribal
engagement within USDA Forest Service R&D.
3. Increase and advance tribal and indigenous values,
knowledge, and perspectives within USDA Forest
Service R&D, including both operational and research
activities.
4. Network and coordinate within R&D and across
deputy areas to increase agency and R&D program
efficacy.
5. Through a collaborative and participatory
approach with tribes and tribal organizations,
advance research on topics of joint interest, such as:
climate change, fire science and management,
traditional ecological knowledge, water and
watershed protection, fish and wildlife, forest products
and utilization, non-timber forest products, restoration,
social vulnerability, and sustainability.
6. Develop and deploy research and technologies to
support tribal decision-making on natural resources
issues.
We firmly believe that engaging with tribes
on projects that incorporate traditional
cultural and spiritual approaches with the
best available science will lead to new and
effective ways to accomplish sustainable
land management across all landscapes. We
invite all our partners to join Forest Service
Research and Development in this effort.
Carlos Rodriguez-Franco
Acting Deputy Chief, Research & Development,
U.S. Forest Service