KHDA Inspection Report - Jumeira Baccalaureate School

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INSPECTION REPORT
INSPECTION REPORT
Jumeira Baccalaureate School
Report published in April 2014
Knowledge and Human Development Authority
P.O. Box 500008, UAE, Tel: +971-4-3640000, Fax: +971-4-3640001, [email protected], www.khda.gov.ae

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT Jumeira Baccalaureate School
Location
Jumeirah First
Type of school
Private
Website
www.jbschool.ae
Telephone
04-3446931
Address
Street 53B off Al Wasl Road, Jumeira 1
Principal
Andrew Homden
Curriculum
UK/IB
Gender of students
Boys and Girls
Age / Grades or Year Groups
KG-Grade 12/3 to 18 years
Attendance
Outstanding
Number of students on rol
850
Largest nationality group of
Emirati
Students
Number of Emirati students
178
Date of the inspection
20th to 22nd January
1

Contents
The context of the school.............................................................................................................. 3
Overall school performance 2013-2014....................................................................................... 4
Key strengths ................................................................................................................................. 4
Recommendations ......................................................................................................................... 4
Progress since the last inspection ................................................................................................ 5
Trend of overall performance........................................................................................................ 5
How good are the students' attainment progress and learning skills? ..................................... 6
How good is the students' personal and social development? .................................................. 7
How good are teaching and assessment?.................................................................................... 7
How well does the curriculum meet the educational needs of all students? ........................... 8
How well does the school protect and support students? .......................................................... 8
How good are the leadership and management of the school? ................................................ 8
How well does the school provide for Emirati students?.......................................................... 15
How well does the school provide for students with special educational needs?.................. 15
How well does the school teach Arabic as a first language?.................................................... 16
What are the views of parents, teachers and students?........................................................... 17
What happens next? .................................................................................................................... 18
How to contact us ........................................................................................................................ 18
2

The context of the school
Jumeira Baccalaureate School is a Taaleem school situated off Al Wasl Road in Jumeira 1. It opened in
September, 2010 with about 80 students on the roll. At the time of inspection there were 850 students
from 72 different nations. The largest national group was Emirati with just over one fifth. Over one-third
of the students learned Arabic as a first language. Almost one-third were registered as having some type
of special educational need. The student population had grown significantly over a short period of time.
The curriculum in the Kindergarten was the English Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). In the
primary phase students followed the National Curriculum of England and Wales for English and
Mathematics, plus the International Primary Curriculum for other subjects. The middle phase
students followed the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (MYP) whilst older
students worked towards the International Baccalaureate Diploma (DP), and BTEC. The school had
ensured that the transition between phases and curricula was seamless. Assessments were
validated externally by International Schools' Assessment. Staffing had increased, with thirteen
new teachers being appointed across the Kindergarten and Primary phases, and a further
fourteen subject specialists in MYP.
3

Overall school performance 2013-2014
Good
Key strengths
-
The outstanding attitudes and behaviour of students leading to exemplary interactions in school;
-
The high quality of support for all students in school, including students with additional needs,
leading to positive academic and personal outcomes;
-
The active engagement of the parents and the community in the life of the school;
-
The effective support, challenge and strategic direction provided by the governors to the school
leadership;
-
The school's vision and strategic drive for continuous improvement.
Recommendations
Improve attainment and progress in Islamic Education and Arabic by:
o
sharing exemplary practice available in other parts of the school;
o
raising expectations in lessons.
Develop students' enquiry and critical thinking skills by:
o
ensuring lessons promote consistently students' independent learning skills of critical
thinking, enquiry and investigation, particularly in phases 1 and 2;
o
using formative and summative assessment information more effectively to guide
students' next step in learning.
Review the curriculum by extending its breadth and balance to include a global dimension to
reflect the needs of different nationalities in the school.
4

Progress since the last inspection
The school had improved the following aspects to outstanding:
- The progress of students in mathematics in Kindergarten;
- The curriculum design to meet the individual needs of students in Grades 11 and 12;
- The quality of support in school.
Trend of overall performance
5

How good are the students' attainment progress and learning skills?
kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Islamic Education
Attainment
Not Applicable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Progress
Not Applicable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Arabic as a first language
Attainment
Not Applicable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Not Applicable
Progress
Not Applicable
Good
Acceptable
Not Applicable
Arabic as an additional language
Attainment
Not Applicable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Not Applicable
Progress
Not Applicable
Acceptable
Acceptable
Not Applicable
English
Attainment
Good
Acceptable
Good
Good
Progress
Good
Good
Good
Good
Mathematics
Attainment
Good
Acceptable
Good
Good
Progress
Outstanding
Good
Good
Good
Science
Attainment
Good
Good
Good
Good
Progress
Good
Good
Good
Good
Read paragraph
kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Quality of students'
Good
Good
Good
Good
learning skills
Read paragraph
6

How good is the students' personal and social development?
kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Personal
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
responsibility
Students'
understanding of
Islamic values and
Good
Good
Good
Good
their local, cultural
and global
awareness
Community and
environmental
Good
Good
Good
Good
responsibility
Read paragraph
How good are teaching and assessment?
Kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Teaching for
Good
Good
Good
Good
effective learning
Assessment
Good
Good
Good
Good
Read paragraph
7

How well does the curriculum meet the educational needs of all students?
kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Curriculum quality
Good
Good
Good
Good
Curriculum design
to meet the
Good
Good
Good
Outstanding
individual needs of
students
Read paragraph
How well does the school protect and support students?
kindergarten
Primary
MYP
DP
Health and Safety
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Quality of Support
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Outstanding
Read paragraph
How good are the leadership and management of the school?
Whole school
Quality of leadership
Good
Self-evaluation and improvement planning
Good
Parents and the community
Good
Governance
Outstanding
Management, including staffing, facilities and resources
Good
Read paragraph
8

How good are the students' attainment and progress?
Attainment in Islamic Education and in Arabic was acceptable across the school. Most students were able
to explain the five Pillars of Islam and the steps required to perform the group prayer appropriately in
Primary. Students in all grades had a clear understanding of Islamic values and the manners expected of a
good Muslim. The Holy Qur'an recitation skills were still developing. Most students displayed knowledge
and skills in line with curriculum expectations. Listening skills were the strongest skill. Reading was within
expectations while the use of standard Arabic in oral communication amongst the older students was
limited. Writing was the weakest skill. A common feature in Arabic as an additional language was the
strong listening skills of most of the students across all phases. Students were able to use familiar
greetings in short conversations. Listening and responding was slightly better in Primary. Most students
across the school could read pre-learned simple sentences or phrases. Writing skills were under-developed
overall. In Primary, attainment in English and mathematics was acceptable, and in science it was good. In
MYP and DP, attainment in English, mathematics and science was good. By the secondary years, students
had steadily built on their skills in English. They were confident speakers, able to access a wide range of
advanced texts and write competently in a variety of genres. In Kindergarten, children had developed a
good understanding of positional language and its use, whilst primary students could identify the
characteristics of prisms using mathematical language. Students in MYP and DP applied their skills of
enquiry confidently over a variety of contexts. In science, attainment was good because students were
provided with opportunities to make connections to solve real life issues. Primary students applied skills
such as predicting, observing and drawing conclusions whilst in MYP and DP students planned, designed
and carried out individual investigations in response to clear learning objectives.
Progress in Islamic Education and Arabic was broadly acceptable across the school. Students were
developing their understanding the Pillars of Islam and the significance of the Islamic practices was
acceptable. However, progress was inadequate in developing Qur'an recitation skills. Progress in Arabic
as a first language was good in Primary where the majority of students were making steady progress in
listening and speaking skills. In MYP, progress in writing skills was slower. In Arabic as an additional
language, students across all phases developed a reasonable range of vocabulary in line with expectations.
In MYP, progress in learning vocabulary was steady but students' use of it to communicate their ideas in
new contexts was limited, both orally and in writing. Students made good progress in English,
mathematics and science. The good progress students made in all aspects of English, from the time they
joined the school, underpinned the attainment of above expected levels later in their school lives. This
progress also gave them a sound foundation for learning across the curriculum. Children in Kindergarten
made outstanding progress in assimilating and applying their mathematical knowledge in a variety of
contexts. In science, progress was good as a result of the opportunities to conduct investigations
9