Moon Gazing

Text-only Preview

Later Elementary Science
Earth and Moon—Partners in Motion
Interactions, Interrelationships, and Interdependence within the Natural World
Student Resource
Name:
Moon Gazing
Galileo’s Telescope
Galileo Galilei was one of the most famous scientists of the Seventeenth Century. He was
a Professor of Mathematics, but he was curious about everything. When Galileo
heard about a new invention called a telescope, he was determined to use it.
Galileo built a better telescope. He used it to look at the moon and the planets. Many
people thought they saw a face in the moon. Some cultures even saw animals, like a rabbit, there.
But Galileo saw mountains and
valleys. He
amazed readers by saying that the
moon had
features that were much like the
Earth.
Galileo saw round areas that he
called craters.
He named the craters and mountains
in Latin. He
saw very dark areas, and thought they
were seas. He
gave the largest features Latin names,
like “Sea of
Storms.”
Today we remember Galileo for his careful observation skills. A NASA spacecraft that
has traveled to the outer edge of the solar system was named Galileo.
January 13, 2003
SCoPE SC040503 Page 1 of 5

Later Elementary Science
Earth and Moon—Partners in Motion
Interactions, Interrelationships, and Interdependence within the Natural World
Student Resource
Near Side
Far Side
Look carefully at these pictures of the moon and at the pictures provided by your teacher. You
may want to use a hand lens, to help you answer these questions.
1. What features can you see on the surface of the moon?
______
2. Is the side of the moon we see (the near side) different than the far side?
____________
3. Galileo called the dark areas “seas” in Latin (mare). How many can you see on the near
side?
____________
4. Are there more dark areas on the far side? ______
5. Can you see any mountains? ______
6. Where are the highest mountains? (Circle them) ______
January 13, 2003
SCoPE SC040503 Page 2 of 5

Later Elementary Science
Earth and Moon—Partners in Motion
Interactions, Interrelationships, and Interdependence within the Natural World
Student Resource
7. Can you see white lines around the craters? ______
8. Can you see any craters inside of craters? ______
9. Can you see anything else inside the craters? ______
10. Develop a hypothesis: From your observations, how do you think the craters got there?

____________
January 13, 2003
SCoPE SC040503 Page 3 of 5

Later Elementary Science
Earth and Moon—Partners in Motion
Interactions, Interrelationships, and Interdependence within the Natural World
Student Resource
January 13, 2003
SCoPE SC040503 Page 4 of 5

Later Elementary Science
Earth and Moon—Partners in Motion
Interactions, Interrelationships, and Interdependence within the Natural World
Student Resource
My Moon Journal
Date
Time
Where was the moon? (direction)
What did the moon look like?
How high was the moon?
When one end of my meter stick was on the ground, and the stick was pointed at the moon, the
other end was high.
January 13, 2003
SCoPE SC040503 Page 5 of 5