The Translation legal concept

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Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport
Royal University of Law and Economics


















HAP PHALTHY


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Contents
Preface........................................................................................................................................ i
Part 1: Terms Used in Criminal Law
Chapter 1: Crimes and Parties Who Commit Them ............................................................ 1
Chapter 2: Larceny and Embezzlement ................................................................................ 7
Chapter 3: Crimes Against the Person................................................................................. 13
Chapter 4: Homicide.............................................................................................................. 19
Chapter 5: Burglary, Arson, Receipt of Stolen Goods, and Forgery ................................ 24
Chapter 6: Crimes Against Moralit and Drug Abuse......................................................... 30
Part II: Terms Used in Law of Torts
Chapter 7: Torts and Trotfeasors......................................................................................... 37
Chapter 8: Intentional Torts ................................................................................................. 43
Chapter 9: Negligence............................................................................................................ 51
Part III: Terms Used in Law of Contracts
Chapter 10: Formation of Contracts.................................................................................... 57
Chapter 11: Contract Requirements.................................................................................... 62
Chapter 12: Assignment, Delegation, and Discharge ......................................................... 68
Part IV: Terms Used in Law of Personal Property and Agency
Chapter 13: Personal Property and Bailments ................................................................... 74
Chapter 14: Law of Agency................................................................................................... 79
Part V: Terms Used in Practice and Procedure
Chapter 15: Beginning a Court Action ................................................................................ 83
Chapter 16: Service of Process and Attachments ............................................................... 89
Chapter 17: Defensive Pleadings .......................................................................................... 95
Chapter 18: Methods of Discovery ..................................................................................... 102
Chapter 19: Jury Trial......................................................................................................... 108
Chapter 20: Steps in Trial ................................................................................................... 116
Part VI: Terms Used in Law of Wills and Estates
Chapter 21: Wills and Testaments .................................................................................... 121
Chapter 22: Rvocation, Lapses, and Ademption............................................................... 127
Chapter 23: Principal Clauses in a Will............................................................................. 133
Chapter 24: Disinheritance and Intestacy ......................................................................... 137
Chapter 25: Personal Representative of the Estate .......................................................... 142
Chapter 26: Settling and Estate .......................................................................................... 144
Chapter 27: Trusts ............................................................................................................... 147
Part VII: Terms Used in Law of Real Property
Chapter 28: Estates in Real Property................................................................................. 152
Chapter 29: Co-Ownership of Real Property.................................................................... 157
Chapter 30: Acquisition of Title to Real Property............................................................ 162
Glossory................................................................................................................................. 167

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Preface



This manuscript was originally prepared in order to facilitate my students' learning. It is also good
for the readers who want to learn American Law can compare this law to own's country's laws.
Readers can also learn legal terms in order to help improve their understanding in studying law in
English language.

This book consists of 7 parts with 30 chapters. It is temporarily compiled as one volume. Each
chapter is introduced the Khmer translation of the text extracted from GORDON W. BROWN,
LEGAL TERMINOLOGY. The last part I introduce a glossary in which the words are extracted
from all chapters. The remained 10 chapters of the origin will be more translated when time
permits. So after finishing it, all chapters will be again compiled with this volume.

The unintentioanl mistakes, however, could be available. So please do appologize to me. I am
looking forward to getting some feedbacks from all of you.

Thanks.






Nagoya, March 2006
HAP Phalthy









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Part I
Terms Used in Criminal Law
BakueRbIknugnItiRBhTN
Chapter 1
Crimes and Parties Who Commit Them
bTelIsRBhTN nigPaKIkIEdlRbRBwtbTelIs

A crime is an offense against the public at large. bTelIsRBhTNKWCabTelIsEdlRbqaMgnwg
saFarNCnTUeTA.
It is a wrong against all of society, not merely against the individual victim alone.
vaCakMhusRbqaMgnwgsgAmCati minRKan;EtRbqaMgnwgCnrgeRKaHpal;Etb:ueNNaHeT.
For that reason, the plaintiff - that is, the one who prosecutes (brings the action) - in a
criminal case is always either the federal, state or local government. cMeBaHehtuplenaH
edImecaTEdlCaGnkniyayecaTRbkan; bwg| enAknugerOgkIRBhTN KWEtgEtCashB1/2n rdae brdaeaPi)al
tamtMbn;.
The one against whom the action is brought is known as the defendant. GnkEdlRtUv)aneKbwgehA
facugecaT.
A person found guilty of a crime is known as a malefactor. GnkEdlRtUv)aneKrkeXIjfaman
kMhusRBhTN ehAfa]RkidaeCn.

A crime consists of either the commission or omission of an act punishable by a
fine, imprisonment, or both. bTelIsRBhTNmanTaMgkarRbRBwt bkarxkxanmin)anRbRBwitGMeBI
NamYy EdlGacRtUvpnaeTasR)ak;Bin1/2yedaykarXMuXaMg bk3/4TaMgBIrEtmg.
No act is criminal unless it is both prohibited and penalized by the law of the place where
it is committed. KanGMeBINamYyCabTelIsRBhTNeT RbsinebIvaminRtUv)aneKhamXat; nigminRtUv)an
eKdak;eTasedayc,ab;enAkEnogEdlekItehtu.
In addition, to protect the innocent, the English common law required the act to be
committed with a particular state of mind known as mens rea, which means criminal
intent. elIsBIenHeTot edIm,IkarBarCnsoUtRtg; c,ab;kumunLGg;eKos RtUvkarGMeBIEdlRbRBwtedayKMnitNa
mYyEdlCabMNg]Rkidae.

Laws that impose a penalty or punishment for a wrong against society are called
penal laws. c,ab;Edldak;eTas bdak;TNkmcMeBaHkMhusRbqaMgnwgsgAmCati ehAfac,ab;RBhTN.

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The U.S. Constitution prohibits Congress or any state from passing a law that is ex post
facto
(after the fact) - that is, one that holds a person criminally responsible for an act that
was not a crime at the time of its commission. rdaeFmnuBaOshrdaeGaemrichamsPa brdaenImYy
BIkarGnum1/2tc,ab;EdlCaRbtiskm bnab;BIGgAehtuNamYy| KWfac,ab;mYyEdl[mnusSmnak;TTYlxusRtUv
EpnkRBhTN cMeBaHGMeBIEdlminEmnCabTelIsRBhTNenAeBlRbRBwt.
Similarly, the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prevents people from being tried
twice for the same offense, which is known as freedom from double jeopardy. dUcKnaenHEdr
viesaFnkmTIR)aM enrdaeFmnuBaOshrdaeGaemrickarBarmnusSBIkarkat;eTasBIrdgcMeBaHbTelIsdUcKna EdleK
ehAfaesrIPaBecjBIkar kat;eTasBIrdg.
CRIMES MALA IN SE AND MALA PROHIBITA
bTRBhTNGaRkk;Cab;knugxoUn nigkarRbRBwtxusnwgbBaOtic,ab;

Crimes are divided into two classes: those that are wrong in and of themselves such
as murder, rape, and robbery, and those that are not in themselves wrong but are criminal
simply because they are prohibited by statute. bTelIsRBhTNRtUv)anEbgEckCaBIrfnak; 1/2

bTelIsTaMgLayNaEdlmankMhusxoUnEgdUcCa Xatkm bTrMelaPesBsnv nigbTelIsbon; RBmTaMg
bTelIsTaMgLayNaEdlminmankMhuspal; b:uEnRKan;EtCabT]Rkidaegay BIeRBaHCabTelIsEdlRtUv)an
hamedayc,ab;.
The former are called crimes mala in se (wrongs in themselves) and require a wrongful or
unlawful intent on the part of the perpetrator. bTelIsTImYyehAfabTelIsGaRkk;Cab;knugxoUn
kMhusxoUnEg| ehIyRtUvkar bMNgxusqAg bbMNgminEmntampoUvc,ab;EdlCaEpnkmYyencarI.
The latter are called crimes mala prohibita (prohibited wrongs) and require no wrongful
intent on the part of the perpetrator. All that is necessary is the doing of the act regardless
of the intent of the actor. bTelIsTIBIrehAfabTelIsxusnwgbBaOtic,ab; kMhusEdleKham| ehIymin
RtUvkarbMNgxusqAgEdlCaEpnkmYyencarIeT. bTelIsTaMgGs;EdlcaM)ac;enaHKWCaGMeBIedayminKitdl;bMNg
enGnkRbRBwt.
Under the common law - that is, the statutory and case law used in England and the
American colonies before the American revolution, all crimes were mala in se. enAeRkam
c,ab;kumunL KWfac,ab; nItibBaOti nigc,ab;yutisa(R)sRtUv)aneRbIenAknugRbeTsGaNaniKmniym Gg;eKos nig
GaemrickaMgmuneBlbdivtGaemrickaMg KWRKb;bTelIsRBhTNTaMgGs;EdlCabTelIsGaRkk;Cab;knugxoUn.

To illustrate a crime mala prohibita, a 1906 state statute made it a crime to transport
intoxicating liquor within the state without a license. edIm,IbgajbTelIsRBhTNEdlxusnwg
bBaOtic,ab; c,ab;enrdaemYyenAqnaM1906 )ancat;TukvafaCabTelIsRBhTNEdlnaMeRKIOgRsvwgcUlknugrdaemYy
edayKanGaCJab1/2NN.
A truck driver in the employ of a common carrier (which was bound to accept all packages
offered to it for transportation and which had no right to compel a shipper to disclose the
package's contents) was convicted of violating the statute when he transported an
unmarked sugar barrel filled with liquor. GnkebIkLandwkTMnijFM edaykareRbIyandwk\v:an; Edl

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yl;RBmdak;\v:an;edIm,IdwkCBaUn ehIyEdlKansiTibgcitbgcMGnkerobcM\v:an; [Rsayrbs;rbrknugkBa(c)b;emIl
eT| RtUvmaneTasbMBanc,ab; enAeBlKat;dwkCBaUnFugsarEdlbMeBjedayRsaKansoaksBaOa.
Nothing about the appearance of the barrel caused suspicion as to its contents, and the
truck driver was ignorant of the fact that it contained intoxicating liquor. KanGVIEdlnaM[sgS1/2y
BIrbs;rbrpukenAknugFug\v:an;enaHeT ehIyGnkebIkLank3/4mindwgGMBIehtukarN_EdlmaneRKOgRsvwgenaHEdr.
The appellate court upheld the conviction, saying that the only fact to be determined is
whether the defendant did the act. sala]TrN_)ankat;esckIedayniyayfa manEtehtukarN_EtmYy
Kt;EdlRtUv)ankMNt;fa etICacugecaT)anRbRBwt bk3/4y:agNa.
The court held that knowledge of the wrongdoing or wrongful intent was immaterial in the
case of a crime mala prohibita. The court said that the legislature has the power to prohibit
certain acts regardless of moral purity or ignorance. tulakarkat;kIfakaryl;dwgBIkarRbRBwtxus
bbMNgxusqAgminTak;TgnwgerOgkIenbTelIsxusnwgbBaOtic,ab;eT. tulakarniyayfaGMNacnItibBaOtiman
GMNachamXat;nUvGMeBImYycMnYn edayminKitdl;PaBbrisuTknugcit bkarmindwgenaHeT.
TREASON, FELONIES, AND MISDEMEANORS
GMeBIk,t;Cati bTelIs]Rkidae nigbTelIsmCAim
Crimes are divided into three principal groups: treason, felonies, and misdemeanors.
bTelIs RBhTN RtUv)anEbgEckCabIRkumKW 1/2 GMeBIk,t;Cati bTelIs]Rkidae nigbTelIsmCAim.
Treason GMeBIk,t;Cati
Treason was divided into high treason (acts against the king) and petit treason (acts against
one's master or lord) under the common law of England. GMeBIk,t;CatiRtUv)anEbgEckCaGMeBIk,t;
CatikRmitx<s; GMeBIRbqaMgnwgRBHmhakSRt| nigGMeBIk,t;CatikRmitTab GMeBIRbqaMgnwgecAhVay bGPiCn|
enAeRkamc,ab;kumunLGg;eKos.
Such a division was never followed in this country, however. EteTaHCay:agNak3/4eday
karEbgEckEbbenHminEdlRtUv)aneKGnuvttameT enARbeTsenH.
Instead, treason is defined in the U.S. Constitution as the levying of war against the United
State or giving aid and comfort to the nation's enemies. puymkvij GMeBIk,t;CatiRtUv)ankMNt;enA
knugrdaeFmnuBaOshrdaeGaemricfaCakareFVIs(R)gAamRbqaMgnwgshrdaeGaemric bkarpl;CMnYy nigkarCYysRmYl
cMeBaHsRtUvrbs;Cati.
Felonies and Misdemeanors bTelIs]Rkidae nigbTelIsmCAim
A felony is a major crime, although its exact definition differs from state to state.
bTelIs]RkidaeKWCabTelIsRBhTNd3/4FMmYy eTaHbICaniymn1/2yBitR)akdrbs;vaxusKnaBIrdaemYyeTArdaemYy
k3/4eday.
It is defined in some states as "punishment by hard labor," and in others as "an infamous
crime" or a crime subject to "infamous punishment." enAknugrdaexoH eK[niymn1/2yvafaCa {kardak;

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eTasbgcM[eFVIkarCaTmn;} nigenAknugrdaexoH[niymn1/2yfaCa {bTelIsRBhTNd3/4sahav} bCabTelIs
RBhTNmYyEdlBak;B1/2nnwg {kardak;TNkmd3/4sahav}.
A misdemeanor, conversely, is a less serious crime than a felony. puymkvij bTelIsmCAimKW
CabTelIsRBhTNminsUvFn;FrCagbTelIs]RkidaeeT.
Crime that are not treason or felonies are classified as misdemeanors and call for a lighter
penalty such as a fine or jail sentence in a place other than a state prison.
bTelIsRBhTNEdlminEmnCa GMeBIk,t;Cati bbTelIs]RkidaeRtUv)ancat;fnak;CabTelIsmCAim ehIyRtUvkar
TNkmRsaldUcCakarBin1/2yCaR)ak; b kardak;KukenAkEnogmYyEdlminEmnCaKukrbs;rdae.
Disturbing the peace and petty larceny are examples of misdemeanors. karrMxandl;sniPaB nig
karlYctUctac KWCabTelIsmCAim.
ACCOMPLICES GnksmKMnit
Anyone who takes part with another in the commission of a crime is called an accomplice.
GnkNaEdlcUlrYmRbRBwtbTelIsRBhTNCamYyGnkepSgeTotehAfaGnksmKMnit.
Principal in the First Degree carITI1

A principal in the first degree is who actually commits a felony either by his or her
own hand or through an innocent agent. carITI1KWCaGnkEdlBitCaRbRBwtbTelIsedayedpal;rbs;
xoUn bedayPnak;garKankMhusNamnak;.
A principal in the first degree is the one who pulls the trigger or strikes the blow. carITI1KWCa
GnkEdlekHek bk3/4)aj;Kna.
One who intentionally places poison in a glass, for example, would be considered a
principal in the first degree even though the glass containing the poison was delivered to
the victim by an innocent third person. ]TahrN_ GnkEdldak;fnaMBuledayectnaenAknugEkvmYynwg
RtUv)aneKcat;TukCaCneddl; eTaHbICaEkvEdlmanfnaMBulRtUv)anykeTA[CnrgeRKaHedayCnTIbIEdlKan
kMhusk3/4eday.
Principal in the Second Degree carITIBIr
A principal in the second degree is one who did not commit the act, but was actually or
constructively present, aiding and abetting another in the commission of a felony.
carITIBIrKWCaGnkEdlmin)anRbRBwtGMeBIeT b:uEnmanvtmanedayCak;Esg bedaysntEdl)anCYyTMnukbRmug
GnkepSgeTot[RbRBwtbTelIs.
Aiding and abetting means participating in the crime by giving assistance or encouragement.
karCYyTMnukbRmugmann1/2yfakarcUlrYmknugbTelIsRBhTNedaykarCYy bkarelIkTwkcit.
One who is positioned outside as a lookout, for example, while his or her companions are
inside committing burglary, would be considered as being constructively present - that is,
made present by legal interpretation. ]TahrN_ GnkEdleK[enAxageRkACaGnkyampoUvenAxNEdl
shcarIenAxagknugkMBugRbRBwtGMeBIlbcUllYc RtUv)aneKcat;Tukfamanvtmanedaysnt KWfamanvtmantam
rykarbkRsaytampoUvc,ab;.

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In a Nevada case, a lookout stationed miles away sent a smoke signal to fellow robbers
signaling that a stagecoach was coming. enAknugerOgkIeNv:ada GnkyampoUvsitenAcmayrab;em:BIKna
edaypl;sBaOaCaEpSgeTA[ecarKnava edIm,ICasBaOafareTHesHdwkGnkdMeNIrmkdl;ehIy.
The court found the lookout guilty as a principal in the second degree, holding that the
lookout was constructively present even though he was miles away from the scene of the
crime. tulakarkat;esckIGnkEdlemIlpoUvfaCacarITI2 ehIycat;TukGnkyampoUvmanvtmanedaysnt eTaHbI
GnkenaHenAcmayrab;em:BIkEnogekItbTelIsRBhTNk3/4eday.

At common law, and in most states today, a principal in the second degree is
subject to the same punishment as that given to a principal in the first degree. tamc,ab;
kumunL nigenAknugrdaeCaeRcInnaeBlbc(c)ub,nn carITIBIrTTYlrgnUvkardak;TNkmdUccarITImYyEdr.
Accessory before the Fact GnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtu
An accessory before the fact is one who procures, counsels, or commands another to
commit a felony, but who is not present when the felony is committed.
GnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtuKWCaGnknaM [eyabl; bk3/4bBaa[GnkNamnak;RbRBwtbTelIs b:uEnxoUnminman
vtmaneTenAeBlEdlbTelIsenaHekIteLIgeT.
Mere knowledge that a crime is going to be committed by another person is not enough to
become an accessory before the fact to the crime that is subsequently committed by the
other person, however. eTaHCay:agNak3/4eday RKan;Etkaryl;dwgmYyEdlfabTelIsRBhTNmYynwg
RbRBwtedayCnepSgeTot vaminRKb;RKan;nwgkoayCaGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtueT cMeBaHbTelIsRBhTN
EdlekIteLIgeRkayCnNaepSgeTotenaH.
It must be shown that the accessory before the fact was active in inducing or bringing
about the felony. vaRtUvEtbgaj[eXIjfaGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtu RtUvEtskmknugkarjuHjg;
bk3/4eFVI[maneLIgnUvbTelIs.

An accessory before the fact will be responsible for natural and probable
consequences that ensue from the crime that he or she induced, but not for a crime of a
substantially different nature. GnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtunwgTTYlxusRtUvcMeBaHvi)akCaFmta nigvi)ak
EdlGacekItmanEdlCaplenbTelIsRBhTNEdlKat;)anjuHjg; b:uEnminEmnCabTelIsRBhTNencrit
dac;edayELkKnaenaHeT.
Thus, if one person procures another to beat someone up, and the beating results in death,
the one who procured the beating would be an accessory before the fact to the killing,
because it is a natural and probable consequence of beating someone up. dUecnH RbsinebICnNa
mnak;naM[Cnmnak;eTotvayKna ehIylTplEdlekIteLIgedayvayKnaenaHrhUtdl;soab; enaHGnkEdlnaM[vay
KnanwgkoayCaGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtuknugkarsmoab; BIeRBaHvaCavi)akenkarvayGnkNamnak;edayFmta
nigGacekItmaneLIg.
Conversely, in the situation in which one person hires a man to beat up a woman, and he
rapes her instead, the procurer would not be an accessory before the fact to the rape,
because it is a crime of a substantially different nature than that which was ordered by the
procurer. puymkvij enAknugsanPaBmYyEdlmnusSmnak;CYlbursmnak;[e)akpUlnarImnak; EtbursenaHEfm

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TaMgeTArMelaPnageTot enaHGnkCYlminEmnCaGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtueT BIeRBaHfabTelIsRBhTN
EdlekIteLIgenaHmancritepSgKna BIGIVEdlGnkCYl[vay)anbBaa[eFVI.

Some states still follow the common law rule that an accessory before the fact
cannot be tried in court until a principal is first convicted. enArdaexoH enAEtGnuvttamc,ab;
kumunLEdlGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtu minGacRtUv)anCMnMuCRmHenAtulakareT rhUtdl;carIRtUv)anykmk
kat;eTasCadMbUg.
Many states, however, now hold that an accessory before the fact may be tried without
regard to the principal and may be found guilty even though the principal is acquitted.
eTaHbICay:agNak3/4eday rdaeCaeRcIn naeBlbc(c)ub,nn Rbkan;CMhrfaGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtu GacRtUv)an
kat;eTasedayminKitBIcarI nigGacRtUvrkeXIjnUvkMhuseTaHbICacarIRtUv)anseRmc[rYceTask3/4eday.

In general, an accessory before the fact is subject to the same punishment as a
principal. CaTUeTAGnksmKMnitmuneBlBiruTehtuTTYlrgkardak;TNkmdUcKnanwgcarIEdr.
Accessory after the Fact GnksmKMniteRkayeBlBiruTehtu

An accessory after the fact is one who receives, relieves, comforts, or assists
another with knowledge that the other person has committed a felony. GnksmKMniteRkay
eBlBiruTehtuKWCaGnkEdlTTYlbnUrbny sRmYl bCYyCnNamnak;edaykardwgfaCnepSgeTot)anRbRBwt
bT]Rkidae.
To be convicted of being an accessory after the fact, a felony must have been committed
by another person, and the accessory after the fact must intent that person avoid or escape
detention, arrest, trial, or punishment. edIm,Idak;eTasGnksmKMniteRkayeBlBiruTehtu bT]RkidaeRtUvEt
RbRBwtedayGnkepSgeTot ehIyGnksmKMniteRkayeBlBiruTehtuRtUvEtmanectna[CnenaHecos beKcBI
karXMuXaMgBIkarcab;xoUn karkat;eTas bBIkardak;TNkm.

At common law, a wife could not be held liable as an accessory after the fact under
the theory that she was under her husband's coercion. c,ab;kumunL RbBnminGacTTYlxusRtUv
CaGnksmKMniteRkayeBlBiruTehtu)aneT edaytamRTwsIEcgfanagsitenAeRkamkarbgcitbgcMrbs;bI.
Modern statutes have extended that exception, although for a different reason, to include
close relatives as well. c,ab;TMenIb)anlatsnwgeTAelIkrNIelIkElgenH eTaHbICamanehtuplepSgKna
k3/4eday edayc,ab;enaHrab;bBa(c)UlTaMgsac;jatiEdlenACitpgEdr.
Rhode Island and Massachusetts, for example, do not allow a criminal's spouse, parent,
grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, or sister to be convicted of being an accessory
after the fact to the criminal. ]TahrN_ enAr:UdGayEln nigm:asaCUEst minGnuBaOat[bI bRbBn
Buk bmay CIdUn bCIta kUn ecA bgbUnRtUv)ankat;eTasCaGnksmKMniteRkayeBlBiruTehtucMeBaH]RkidaeCn
enaHeLIy.

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6


Chapter 2
Larceny and Embezzlement
karlYc nigkarekgRbv1/2Ba(c)

The crimes of larceny and embezzlement originated under the English common law,
which was the law that this country inherited from England. bTelIsRBhTNenkarlYc
nigkarekgRbv1/2Ba(c))anekItecjBIc,ab;kumunL EdlCac,ab;mYyEdlRbeTsenHTTYlBIGg;eKos.
LARCENY karlYc

The common law definition of larceny is the wrongful taking and carrying away of
personal property of another with the intent to steal. niymn1/2yc,ab;kumunLGMBIkarlYcKWkarRbRBwt
xus nigykRTBurbs;eKedaymanbMNglYc.
Broken down into its elements, the crime consists of the following. edayEbgEckCaFatupSMtUc
bTelIsRBhTNGMBIkarlYcenHrYmmandUcxageRkam /
1. A wrongful taking karykxusc,ab;
2. A carrying away karykecj
3. Personal property clnRTBu
4. Of another enGnkdeT
5. With intent to steal edaymanbMNglYc
Wrongful Taking karykxusc,ab;

A wrongful taking means a trespass to someone else's possession of goods (articles
of personal property). karykxusc,ab;mann1/2yfakarbMBanelIePaKenRTBurbs;GnkepSgeTot rbs;
EdlCaclnRTBu|.
More precisely, it is the exercise of dominion and control over the personal property in the
possession of another, without the right to do so. c,as;CagenHeTAeTot vaCakarGnuvtenGMNac
RtUtRta nigkarRtUtBinituBIelIRTBuEdlsitknugePaKrbs;GnkdeT edayKansiTieFVIdUecnaHeLIy.
Asportation
karykeTA)at;

In addition to the wrongful taking, a carrying away must occur, which is called an
asportation in legal terminology. This act involves a removal of the property from the
place it formerly occupied. elIsBIkarRBwtxusenHeTAeTot karykecjRtUvEtekIteLIgEdlehAfa kar
ykeTA)at; enAknugBakubec(c)keTsc,ab;. GMeBIenHTak;TgeTAnwgkarruHerIRTBuBIkEnogmYyEdlvataMgenABImun.

To illustrate, in a case in which a thief attempted to steal a fur coat from a store
dummy but was unable to do so because the coat was attached to the dummy by a chain,
the court held that no larceny occurred, because the coat was not carried away.
edIm,Ibgaj[)anc,as; enAknugerOgkImYyEdlknugenaH ecar)anb:unb:glYcGaveramstVecjBIGavtaMgenhag

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