Things To Know About Sailing In Croatia

Text-only Preview

Things To Know About Sailing In Croatia

If you're looking for a Mediterranean paradise that appears to be created for sailing, Croatia is
definitely it! With a coastline considered to be the pearl of the Mediterranean, a wonderfully mild
climate, and a thousand sun-kissed islands set on turquoise seas, Croatia truly deserves its growing
popularity as a haven for sailors.
Whether you're planning a leisurely chartered yacht cruise complete with pilot and crew, or relaxing at
the helm of your own smaller hire vessel, island hopping around popular ports and lonely bays, it's an
island that definitely puts the exhilaration in sailing. Croatia has many options for enjoying the islands
and the waters, whether you want to take it fast or slow. Naturally, however, there are a few things
you will need to know when you're planning on going sailing. Croatia's sea adventures are a
spectacular experience, but do go prepared, and only with reputable companies.
Climate and Weather
The mild Mediterranean climate is one of the reasons that this paradise is among the best places in
the world to go sailing. Croatia enjoys a large number of sunny days per year, with an average 2600
hours of sunshine per year. While the sunny days come with a bit of heat, the lower humidity and
coolness that come when the sun goes down keeps the climate comfortable. Average temperatures
tend to drop rapidly after summer, spring and autumn are generally mild, and winter is short.
One of the key things to remember is to make sure to monitor weather forecasts before going out
segling i kroatien weather can be fairly unpredictable, with winds changing direction in a matter of
minutes. The direction that the winds take offer a hint to how the weather will behave: southern winds
called Jugo bring warm, moist air and rainy weather, while northeasterly winds called Bura bring cool
dry winds that are usually followed by a typhoon, and with it, foamy waters and fog. Always keep
abreast of local information and follow the advice of sailing tour company operators.
Currents
Keeping close to the coastline is one of the easiest ways to ensure smooth sea-going journeys.
Croatia's side of the Adriatic is calmer than that on the Italian one, as the many islands break the
undercurrents. However, there are small channels between where the current is stronger, reaching up
to 4 knots. Tidal differences are relatively small, varying from 15 to 50 centimetres. Southern winds
(Jugo) cause higher waves than the Bura, which comes from the mainland. However, beware of the
Bura and its waves: they might be smaller, but they are much more irregular and much more
powerful.
Winds
Aside from Jugo and Bura, there are other types of winds that are named according to the direction
they come from. Maestral winds, fairly common during summer, come from the sea blowing towards
the direction of the mainland - and along with them, sunny weather with fluffy white clouds. For trips
along Croatia's coastline, one of the best types of winds to have is the Tramontana, which is similar to
the Bura, but comes from the mountains and is gentler and more constant