Work and Organization: The Aesthetic Dimension

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A Volume in
Ideas in Critical Postmodernism
Volume One
Work and Organization:
The Aesthetic Dimension
i

Ideas in Critical Postmodernism
Series Editor: David Boje
Volume 1:
Work and Organization:


The Aesthetic Dimension


Adrian Carr and Philip Hancock (eds.)


ISBN 978-0-9817032-5-1.
Volume 2:
Discourses & Paradigms


Susanne M. Fest & Darin A. Arsenault (eds.)


Forthcoming 2009.
Volume 3:
Management & Goodness


Heather Hopfl & Ron Beadle (eds.)


Forthcoming 2009.
Volume 4:
Narrative & Time


Eric Kramer (eds.)


Forthcoming 2009.
ii

Ideas in Critical Postmodernism:
Volume One
Work and Organization:
The Aesthetic Dimension
Edited by
Adrian Carr & Philip Hancock
Publishing
3810 N 188th Ave
Litchfield Park, AZ 85340
iii

Cover Image: Technospirit by Virginia Maria Romero.
About the artist: Virginia Maria Romero (agzromero@zianet.
com) is an award winning artist whose works reflect original
contemporary designs that express the distinctive voice of their
creator. The style, color and compositions of her acrylics as well
as her retablos continue to exhibit her uniqueness and creative
quality. To see more of her art, http://www.artederomero.
com/.
Work and Organization: The Aesthetic Dimension
Ideas in Critical Postmodernism: Volume 1
Edited by: Adrian Carr and Philip Hancock
Library of Congress Control Number: 2009922907
ISBN13: 978-0-9817032-5-1
Copyright © 2009 ISCE Publishing, 3810 N 188th Ave, Litch-
field Park, AZ 85340, USA.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be
reproduced, stored on a retrieval system, or transmitted,
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, pho-
tocopying, microfilming, recording or otherwise, without
written permission from the publisher.
Printed in the United States of America.
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CONTENTS
Series Introduction .................................................vii

David Boje
Editorial
Art and Aesthetics at Work:
An Overview ...............................................................1

Adrian Carr & Philip Hancock
Chapter 1
Art as a Form of Knowledge:
The Implications for Critical Management .....13

Adrian Carr
Chapter 2
Organizational Performance:
A View from the Arts .............................................57

Ceri Watkins & Ian W. King
Chapter 3
The Power of Organizational Song:
An Organizational Discourse and
Aesthetic Expression of Organizational
Culture ........................................................................87

Nick Nissley, Steven S. Taylor & Orville Butler
Chapter 4
On the Manager’s Body as an Aesthetics
of Control ................................................................119

Nancy Harding
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Chapter 5
An-Aesthetics and Architecture ......................147

Karen Dale & Gibson Burrell
Chapter 6
Aestheticizing the World of Organization:
Creating Beautiful Untrue Things ...................173

Philip Hancock
vi

Series Editor’s Introduction to
Ideas in Critical Postmodernism
Volume 1
I am proud and excited to introduce the new series: Ideas
in Critical Postmodernism. We are exhibiting the best Ta-
mara: Journal of Critical Organization Inquiry
has to of-
fer.

The cover for our first volume is by world class artist,
Virginia Maria Romero, a painting she calls, ‘Technospirit.’
To see more of her art visit ,http://www.artederomero.com.
Vriginia Maria and I have joined art and business forces to en-
gage local arts organizations in a critical investigation of our
local arts economy, and its aesthetics.

The first volume of the book series is Work, Aesthetics
and Organization edited by Adrian Carr and Philip Hancock.
To continue my storytelling, New Mexico has rather poor
arts economies in the southern part of the state, and the the
more renowned Santa Fe and Taos to the north. Local work
and aesthetics and arts organizations exhibit a contestation, a
competition to advance and affirm their arts scenes.

The second volume of this book series will be Dis-
course and Paradigms edited by Susanne M. Fest and Darin A.
Arsenault. I like storytelling, so here is another verse. There
are so many artistic paradigms moving into New Mexico,
into Dona Ana County where I live, that a multiplicity of dis-
courses flourish. We have tried various open space and world
cafe methods of discourse, but somehow its not the kind of
dialogic imagination that inspired Bakhtin. Instead there is a
lot of monologue calling itself dialogue, and efforts to enforce
or impose consensus hegemony by the powers that be. Noth-
ing dialogical in the herd of discourses, that remain disem-
bodied, disestablished, just so many lines on a flip chart, with
most of the good stuff invisible to the process of recording.

The third volume in the book series will be Manage-
ment and Goodness edited by Heather Hopfl and Rod Beadie.
To continue my rant. There is an ethics of goodness that those
who manage the arts and culture of our county, be they in the
public, private or grassroots establishment, can not seem to
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sort out. An ethics of goodness is something we would like to
meet. It sounds like its Aristotelean, but more to the point its
a kind of Bakhtinian answerability (or I would like it to be so).
There are these once occurent times in the moment of being
where people managing and being managed could chose to
act, to intervene in the now, and bring some different ‘being’
artist about.

The fourth planned volume in the book series is Nar-
rative and Time edited by Eric Kramer. Now you now what I
will say. That narrative is so established, so retrospective, so
whole, so caught up in beginning, middle, and end that it can
not recognize other forms of storytelling. To me, those other
forms are living story, the nowness of being in the moment,
and my telling is in the middle, no ending, no beginning, but
I have to tell you this other living story that relates to others’
being. And second, there is this ‘antenarrative,’ bet on the fu-
ture, a prospective sensemaking, a morph, a changeling that
is ever part of emergence, moving disorder into order, finding
solace in chaos to bring about something that never was in
narrative, something falling out of living story webs.

So there you have it a storytelling introduction to a
book series, Ideas in Critical Postmodernism. Perhaps I am the
last postmodernist still breathing, still using the burned out
word. I don’t mean every kind of postmodernism, I mean one
wed to Critical Theory (capitalized, to represent old school,
Frankfurt style, and before that Nietzsche). Tamara Journal
once had postmodern its its title, but no one reads postmod-
ernism anymore. So we dropped it and I am thankful to Kurt
Richardson and ISCE Publishing for rescuing it from the dust
bowl of history.
David M. Boje
11 February, 2009
New Mexico
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